The Small Acts of Many

 

True social movements grow by the small acts of many people. So it says on the organizing page of the Green Party (www.greenparty.org) and so it has been throughout history. That is why I am confident that we, all of us, individual by individual, can change the current plight of the wild horses in the US, recently threatened (again) by extinction at the hands (and minds) of certain cattle ranchers and government officials (details inside this issue).

The recently proclaimed 'National Day of the Horse' reminds us that there are a lot of horse lovers and supporters out there, which is a good thing for the mustangs. Those horses, cousins of our domestic horses and the horses who built our country, need all the help they can get - and they deserve no less than every American's support. Please read the 3 articles inside - from one who's been there, one who lives there, and one who admires the horses from afar - about the mustangs' plight on their own, our own, public lands, set aside for them, not for cattle or oil drilling or other destruction. That designated land, and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), were supposed to give them protection - but that has not been happening all along. It has been quite the opposite. It is high time the law-breakers, lawmakers, and law enforcers be held accountable, and the horses be given their rightful sanctuary, as deemed by the 1971 Wild Horse and Burro Protection Act (recently overturned). The 1971 act was initiated by Velma Johnston (aka Wild Horse Annie) BECAUSE of the cruel slaughtering of wild horses that she witnessed.

Update (Jan. 25): A bill introduced in the House of Representatives (H.R. 297) would restore the prohibition on the commercial sale and slaughter of wild horses and burros. Go to www.wildhorsepreservation.com. In addition, on Feb. 1, H.R. 503 (the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act) was reintroduced. Go to www.saplonline.org for more info.

The best way to 'manage' the horses, I believe, is to NOT manage them, and just give them back their land. They will self-manage, and there will not be 'excess' as so many believe is the problem. Nature manages them appropriately, unlike the BLM and adoptions - both of which are not very horse-friendly, add up to a huge, wasteful, unnecessary expenditure for the American people, and are counter-productive anyway. In the wild, reproduction naturally declines as numbers increase, and revs up as numbers are reduced. Please tell your congressmen your thoughts.

Also in this issue of Natural Horse, you will find some interesting and informative articles on pasture, founder, dentistry, enzymes, vaccinations, and more.

Please check out our inside back cover for the Hoof Trimmer Partner-Up Page to find hoof care near you, and the second-last page for the Equine Dentistry Partner-Up-Page to find dentistry near you.

To be on either list, contact us at 800-660-8923 or publisher@naturalhorse.com. Remember that in some states it is illegal for a non-veterinarian to do equine dentistry; check into your state's laws at www.naturalhealth.org and www.IAATH.com. If you don't like your laws, get involved in changing them.

Enjoy the issue!

closer

 

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